Secretary of Commerce, "No exemptions on tariff measures".


Following the announcement, Wisconsin's Republican Gov. Scott Walker asked Trump to reconsider his position on the tariffs - and said he had expressed his views on the matter to Ross previous year. "But as of the moment, as far as I know, he's talking about a fairly broad brush". "I have not heard him describe particular exemptions just yet", Ross said.

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said it "shouldn't be a surprise to anybody in the whole wide world" that President Donald Trump is putting trade restrictions on steel.

Ross reiterated that there would be no exceptions to the rule.

"We shall see, we shall see".

"Using "national security" tools to implement tariffs could embolden other countries to impose "national security" tariffs on USA exporters or otherwise restrict US goods and services sold to their markets", Business Roundtable President and CEO Joshua Bolten said in a statement on Thursday. They've been talking with me.

Ross also told NBC's "Meet the Press" on Sunday that retaliation won't change the price of consumer goods, even those that rely on imported steel and aluminum. "The President makes the decision".

"Steel tariffs should not surprise anyone".

Peter Navarro, director of the White House National Trade Council, said exempting countries was a slippery slope.

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Russia's state-sponsored doping program was first exposed by WADA's independent McLaren Investigation in July 2016. ABC News said the video was produced a year ago to promote the clothing brand.

"You notice the companies complaining never say what's the actual impact".

Ross addressed concerns that the tariffs could affect the USA economy, saying they were "rubbish". He said the total amount of tariffs the United States government is proposing is about $9% a year, a fraction of 1% of the economy.

"So, the notion that it would destroy a lot of jobs, raise prices, disrupt things is wrong".

He acknowledged that other countries might retaliate by imposing tariffs of their own on American goods - as the European Union has threatened to do for blue jeans, motorcycles, and bourbon - but insisted the effects would be small. In a tweet on Saturday, Trump went on the offensive, threatening the European Union with a tax on its automobile imports. "So if that goes up by 25 percent, that's about six-tenths of 1 cent on the price on a can of Campbell's soup", Ross argued.

"In Ross" words: "Overall it's not going to be much more than a rounding error".

The Business Roundtable's Josh Bolten, a chief of staff for President George W. Bush, tells "Fox News Sunday" that "every modern president has faced some trade skirmishes during their time but they've all been wise enough not to let it descend into outright trade war".

"The beer industry, you'll notice, hasn't put forward any numbers", Ross added.

"You're letting China off the hook". Graham says "China is winning and we're losing with this tariff regime".