'13 Reasons Why' is making major changes to season two

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The clip will autoplay ahead of the first episode in each season.

"'13 Reasons Why is a fictional series that tackles tough, real world issues, taking a look at sexual assault, substance abuse, suicide and more", Prentice says.

"But if you are struggling with these issues yourself, the series may not be right for you", warns Davis.

Additionally, Netflix announced that it is adding crisis resources and a viewing guide to 13ReasonsWhy.Info, and will start a new after-show titled Beyond the Reasons, where actors, experts, and educators will break down the series. The show portrayed her death in a graphic scene which saw Hannah slit her wrists, sparking debates about whether or not the scene was necessary or sensationalized.

Brian Wright, the streamer's vice president of original series, gave a detail on this and other matters about 13 Reasons Why.

The series is based on Jay Asher's novel, but Season 2 was written after the buzz that the first season received in March 2017.

The second season of 13 Reasons Why is set to be released this year.

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When the show first hit the streaming service past year, it sparked plenty of big conversations as it covers themes of bullying, suicide, mental health and sexual assault.

It found that while "nearly three-quarters of teen and young adult viewers said the show made them feel more comfortable processing tough topics", a majority of parents surveyed wanted more resources, like guidance from mental health experts, the statement from Netflix said.

"Most importantly, we learned that the show prompted conversations between parents and adolescents about hard issues they are facing", said Wartella, who also is a professor of psychology, human development and social policy, and medical social sciences and chair of the department of communication studies in Northwestern's School of Communication.

The show rapidly found itself at the centre of a backlash, with two schools in the United Kingdom even warning parents not to let their kids watch it alone. They will also recommend how the viewers can get support if they needed.

"The book concludes at the same place season one concluded and we were, at Netflix prepared for it to be only one season, if that was what the best version of the show was", said Wright about the controversial decision to renew the drama.

The Canadian Association for Suicide Prevention, Depression Hurts and Kids Help Phone 1-800-668-6868 all offer ways of getting help if you, or someone you know, may be suffering from mental health issues.

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