GRASSLEY SPEAKS: Senate Judiciary Chairman Releases Kavanaugh Statement

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US President Donald Trump's nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court has been thrust into turmoil after the woman accusing him of high school-era sexual misconduct told her story publicly for the first time.

Senate Republicans want to follow up with Kavanaugh's accuser, Christine Blasey Ford, in the regular order of the Senate confirmation process.

While Ford initially sought to keep her allegation confidential, she said she opted to go public once the allegation emerged in the public eye and reporters began pursuing her.

The panel would also likely seek testimony from Mark Judge, Mr Kavanaugh's friend and classmate.

Judge denied the allegation in an interview with The Weekly Standard on Friday.

"I thought he might inadvertently kill me", Ms Ford said.

Kellyanne Conway, Trump's top female aide, also said Ford should be heard out.

Kavanaugh has said he was not at the party where the incident was alleged to have occurred, according to a White House official.

"I have received information from an individual concerning the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court", Feinstein said in a statement. "They locked the door and played loud music precluding any successful attempt to yell for help".

Kavanaugh issued a new denial Monday morning in response to a woman's allegation that he assaulted her when they were both in high school. She said that Kavanaugh put his hand over her mouth when she screamed, and only stopped when another teenager broke up the encounter. It will not matter if 65 women come forward and attest to Kavanaugh's sterling character - in fact, for Democrats, it's merely confirmation that the judge is covering something up. Feinstein acknowledged her knowledge of the accusation last week, but kept Ford's identity private until the Sunday Post article. Sen.

Ford alleged in an earlier Post story Sunday that Kavanaugh and a friend - both "stumbling drunk" - corralled her in a bedroom.

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Ford has accused Kavanaugh, a conservative appeals court judge chosen by Trump for a lifetime job on the top US court, of trying to attack her and remove her clothing while drunk in 1982 in a Maryland suburb outside Washington when they were students in different high schools.

Even Gateway Pundit backpedaled, deleting the portion of its story about Ford's reviews. She told The Post there were four boys at the party but only two in the room.

Ford is a professor and research psychologist in Northern California at Palo Alto University and the Stanford University PsyD Consortium, a clinical psychology program where she teaches statistics, research methods and psychometrics.

"He spoke about acts that he had seen in pornographic films involving such matters as women having sex with animals, and films showing group sex or rape scenes".

Citing unreleased records from Kavanaugh's official work over the years, Democrats have called for a delay in considering his nomination.

On Monday, Katz said her client is willing to testify before the Senate on her allegation that Kavanaugh tried to rape her in high school.

"He is somebody very special", Trump said of his nominee.

But Conway said such testimony "should not unduly delay the vote".

Kavanaugh's statement came shortly after Ford said through her attorney that she would be willing to speak with Congress to tell her side of the story.

As Democrats have called for a delay in the vote - scheduled for Thursday - some Republicans have joined their colleagues across the aisle in support for a pause.

South Carolina GOP Sen. "This is not only going to get more women to turn out to vote, it's also going to persuade a lot of Republican women who voted for moderate Republicans in suburbs, including in states like Texas, Tennessee and other red states, to say enough's enough".

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