Cricket Australia chairman Peever resigns

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Cricket Australia will seek to start fresh after one of its most uncertain and unedifying chapters, with chairman David Peever's forced resignation completing an overhaul that started some seven months ago in Cape Town.

"Given my media role, I don't believe being chairman would be appropriate", Taylor told wwos.nine.com.au.

Earl Eddings, a former Cricket Victoria director who was confirmed as deputy chair at last week's AGM, has been installed as interim chair until the board convenes in the near future to undertake the process of making a permanent appointment.

Long-serving board member Mark Taylor, who has served as a conduit between administrators and players for nearly 15 years, is already out of the race despite pleas from former CA chief executive Malcolm Speed and former CA chairman Bob Merriman. He has previously served as chief executive of the South Australian Cricket Association, 2015 World Cup and 2006 Commonwealth Games.

Peever's resignation comes in the wake of criticism stemming against him from the review of corporate and on-field culture released earlier this week which holds him responsible for the ball-tampering saga.

But Peever said he was "not embarrassed at all" and expressed his desire to oversee the cultural changes outlined in the review's 42 recommendations.

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But long-serving board member Taylor, who has served as a conduit between administrators and players for nearly 15 years, has already pulled out of the race.

Another ex-Test player and current board member, Michael Kasprowicz, could get the nod if CA heeds the call from Speed for a "dyed-in-the-wool cricket" leader to assume the role.

Peever had refused to quit on Monday, calling the sandpaper scandal a "hiccup" despite The Ethics Centre review suggesting otherwise while describing CA as arrogant, dictatorial, controlling, disrespectful, hypocritical and responsible for the normalisation of verbal abuse.

Hey impressed while presenting the Longstaff report publicly with Peever on Monday, when Peever insisted he was the right man to still lead the board.

Peever had until now kept his job despite the exit of CA chief executive James Sutherland, coach Darren Lehmann and team performance boss Pat Howard.

"The Cricket NSW board commends David Peever for showing leadership at a hard time by standing down".

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